MY STYLE CRUSH: Kerry Washington

Kerry Washington has been on my radar for a few years now with great roles in films like Ray (playing Ray Charles’ wife, Della Bea Robinson) and Last King of Scotland (playing Idi Amin‘s wife, Kay). However,  I think for me — like everyone else– she has been propelled to the forefront of everyone’s mind in her new role as Olivia Pope in ABC’s Scandal. Who doesn’t love seeing a highly successful, incredibly smart, beautiful (and yet so vulnerable) woman– and woman of color at that– getting it done and doing it looking with a stylish swagger to boot? I have to admit, part of the appeal for me is that Olivia Pope is the ultimate PR maven (as many of you may know, I am a PR Diva myself– I’m the woman behind the integrated communications firm Siena Media Group and the PR incubator, NY PR Diva).  And of course, practically every woman in America covets her style. Kerry Washington’s status has landed her on the cover of this month’s Elle Magazine.

The multi-page feature (comprised of a beautifully shot spread and dynamic interview) gives the readers of Elle a  glimpse into who the woman behind the “gladiators” really is. Kerry Washington dons Marc Jacobs, Giorgio Armani, Tom Ford and more in an ode to denim couture.

Not to give too much of the article away (seriously you should make sure you get a copy for yourself), Elle delved into this native New Yorker’s (she was born in the Bronx) past to show that Washington is much more than a pretty face in movies and on television. A product of one of the city’s most prestigious preparatory academies, the Spence School, and a Phi Beta Kappa graduate from George Washington University (she gave the commencement address to the Class of 2013), Kerry talks about her journey of self discovery, how she found her happiness and who she is when she’s not on camera.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Ms. Washington has been making the rounds in the press a lot recently. In addition to  the Elle feature, she also graced the covered and interviewed for the LA Times Magazine.  Recently, she sat down with fellow actor Don Cheadle for a candid interview with Variety Magazine about life in Hollywood, race, gender and activism. Watching the video gave me a renewed respect for both of these amazing people. Both talked about education, how they view race and gender in Hollywood and how they have affected their careers, why activism important and so much more.  Here’s the video for your viewing pleasure.

I can’t wait until the new season of Scandal starts in the fall– more drama, more style. more Kerry!

“DARE” TO BE BOLD: New Plus Magazine Launches with Spring Issue

Okay. Okay. I can here some of you muttering under your breath already with, “not another one.” This isn’t the first nor will it be the last plus magazine that will burst on to the market but I have to say I’m hoping Dare Magazine will be one that will stay.

DARE Magazine

What’s so special about Dare?

Well, it’s founder, Diana Di Poce, a senior at Ryerson University in Canada, is looking do something that her predecessors did not.  She’s NOT trying to change the world or “rally the troops” so to speak like others of her generation and even other magazine before her. Rather she’s trying to provide a source of inspiration for curvy girls throughout Canada and beyond. Geared toward the woman size 12 and above, her purpose of the magazine is to acknowledge and inspire the woman with the fuller figure and all women in general of all shapes and sizes.

In a recent interview, Di Poce said, “I wanted to keep it more general in the way that any woman can look at the magazine and get inspiration from it…just like how I pick up an issue of Elle or Flare…even though I won’t fit these outfits and I won’t look like these models, I still get inspiration from it.”

Born of her final school project, the Fashion Communications major picked the ideal time to launch with the burgeoning acknowledgement plus size women are receiving from the fashion and beauty industry– though there are still some brands that are dead set against anyone over a size 8 wearing their clothing (let’s not even talk about the Abercrombie founder’s comments about not wanting “fat” or “ugly” people wearing his clothes. It’s his prerogative at the end of the day; the public’s choice whether or not to support.If you want to read the story for yourself, click here.)

I’m looking to see more and what the direction the magazine will take. But for now, it is piquing my interest and I am throwing in my support.

To find out more about Dare Magazine, visit www.daremag.ca.